Supporting Early Music Making

When the children in our care are exploring musical concepts for the first, fifth or fiftieth time, it can be tricky for us (as adults) to say the right thing. Everybody has a memory of being a child and being told you cannot do something or that you aren’t good enough, and it can completely destroy your confidence. To make sure this doesn’t happen to the children in your care, here are some things you can say to continue encouraging them without harming their self confidence.

If a child continues to sing the same song over and over and over again…“Wow, you really know that song! I don’t think *insert name here* knows it very well though, do you think you could teach them?” This not only gives you a little break, but it also instills confidence in the child, as you really need to know something inside out to be able to teach it. This can then lead on to a great reflection process on how their teaching went. Why did it work? Why didn’t it work? Did they like the song?

On an occasion when a child is singing/playing really loud and you need them to be quite… “You’ve really mastered singing/playing loudly! Do you think you could sing/play softly?” Sometimes life happens, and you just need five minutes of quiet while you take a phone call, finish getting lunch or recharge your mental batteries. This is a great way to start exploring dynamics without discouraging their creativity.

When all else fails, think of it this way: If a colleague did a presentation for you on something they are passionate about, what would you say to them? How can you be respectful without discouraging their effort? If a child wants to sing or play for you, they are beyond excited to share this special gift with you. Just sit back, and enjoy it!

 

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