What’s in a name?

Someone asked me today why I chose to name our company Allegro Education. Although I put a lot of thought into this decision, I realised it is not written anywhere.

Allegro is a musical term that instructs the musician to play the piece cheerfully, with joy or in a lively fashion. This feeling is something that I wanted our clients to experience when using our services. Every child should feel joyful whilst learning, no matter the subject matter. Allegro also references my roots as a music educator.

Our catch phrase, or tag line Learning at your tempo expresses our philosophy as educators, that it doesn’t matter what pace a child is learning, it only matters that they never stop.

Singing when you’re not a singer

The one comment I hear over and over in my profession is “I’m not a singer, so I can’t do music at home”.

Let’s get one thing straight, everyone is a singer, and the most important audience you will sing for are your children. You don’t have to be in tune, sing with the melody or even be in time! The most important thing is that you are confident and put yourself out there. This will not only strengthen the bond between you and your children as they observe that you are not afraid to express yourself in front of them, but the more you sing the better you will be! Like anything, practice makes perfect.

So, how do you get started?

  1. Find a song you like

This can be any song you have a connection with, but  would suggest a song with easy words and a simple melody. Some great examples are You are my Sunshine, Here Comes the Sun, Morning town Ride and Raindrops keep falling on my head. 

2. Learn the song so you could sing it in your sleep

Play the song all the time. In the shower, in the car and when you wake up. Look up the lyrics and make sure you sing the correctly. I sang ‘Our lips are sealed’ as ‘Alex the seal’ and was very confused as a child! If you are going to sing this song to your children, it’s important you are singing the right words, otherwise you end up with confused faces looking back at you!

3. Build up your confidence

Find a version of the song you really like on iTunes or Google music and sing along with it until you begin to feel confident with the words and the melody. As your confidence builds, turn down the music bit by bit, so you can hear your voice over the top of the music. Do this for as long as you need to!

4. Practice, practice, practice!

Keep at it! Children need repetition to create strong pathways between different parts of their brain. If they are asking for the same song over and over, it means they are still learning things from it.

Tips:

If you have the music turned down very low, but still aren’t feeling confident, try and find a karaoke version of the song, so you still have some kind of backing track to sing along to.

If singing makes you nervous and you forget the lyrics, print out a copy of them to read off. Building your confidence will take time, so if this helps, go for it!

The only audience you need are your children, no one else needs to hear you sing. I guarantee they will adore sharing this time with you, and one day they will feel confident in joining in.

 

Supporting Early Music Making

When the children in our care are exploring musical concepts for the first, fifth or fiftieth time, it can be tricky for us (as adults) to say the right thing. Everybody has a memory of being a child and being told you cannot do something or that you aren’t good enough, and it can completely destroy your confidence. To make sure this doesn’t happen to the children in your care, here are some things you can say to continue encouraging them without harming their self confidence.

If a child continues to sing the same song over and over and over again…“Wow, you really know that song! I don’t think *insert name here* knows it very well though, do you think you could teach them?” This not only gives you a little break, but it also instills confidence in the child, as you really need to know something inside out to be able to teach it. This can then lead on to a great reflection process on how their teaching went. Why did it work? Why didn’t it work? Did they like the song?

On an occasion when a child is singing/playing really loud and you need them to be quite… “You’ve really mastered singing/playing loudly! Do you think you could sing/play softly?” Sometimes life happens, and you just need five minutes of quiet while you take a phone call, finish getting lunch or recharge your mental batteries. This is a great way to start exploring dynamics without discouraging their creativity.

When all else fails, think of it this way: If a colleague did a presentation for you on something they are passionate about, what would you say to them? How can you be respectful without discouraging their effort? If a child wants to sing or play for you, they are beyond excited to share this special gift with you. Just sit back, and enjoy it!